An introduction to transmedia in Singapore: outlook and predictions for 2014-15

It has been two months since I went to Singapore to join the pioneering efforts of South East Asian content creators that shape the future of Asian storytelling, but already lots of things are in motion. It feels like the market just waited for the right technology impulses to wake the sleeping transmedia Merilion.

Most certainly we will see significant projects coming from the SEA region in 2014-15 and among them will hopefully be the long awaited proof of concepts for the industry traditionalists that kept saying “wait and see” for the past couple of years.

Defining transmedia in Asia

Regardless of a long Asian tradition in creating vast cross-platform story universes in genre productions, comics and monster franchises, “transmedia” is nothing but a buzzword at this point in time. Storytelling practices of the old masters have been lost in pop culture, ignored by the education system or arrogantly dismissed by recent generations.

Local creators who read up on the topic and try to apply means of transmedia to their projects are rare and mostly visionaries with a strong sense for business development. Ultimately, transmedia does not have much of a pure storytelling character in Asia anymore nor are its primary drivers public funds or academic projects.

Seen as temporary bridge solution, at best, a transmedia concept is something that can add value to entertainment properties and brand building campaigns, but only when you got the right media strategy, partners and production set up.

Budget-wise it is still a nightmare and there are very few qualified agencies around that could handle a full transmedia campaign, creatively and administratively. The question of qualified local talent that brings in a hybrid education and right mindset will be a pressing issue for the months to come.

The Asian tradition and the lack of innovation

Ad agencies and production house still hire people with decades of expertise in banner booking on shopping mall facades instead of looking for digital natives with a storytelling background. It just makes no sense when you see a brand looking on JobsDB for a Social Media Manager with 12 years working experience. Only a few institutions offer hybrid models of education for jobs in the digital and design space only to see their graduates becoming flight attendants or button punchers at TV show control rooms.

Project and content development is still the weakest point in the production chain and barely taken seriously by anyone with money. Being common practice for independent producers to develop their own content bigger production houses frenetically push this unprofitable work toward summer interns from film schools where project development is not even on the curriculum. Too many industry deals are made simply based on name and reputation of project partners regardless whether they can deliver or how they address recent market trends.

The main obstacles of innovation in Asia, however, are corporate structures that have not been altered for the past 50 years and there is no motivation to change something that has worked so well for so long. Everybody got money for the quick fix but not for sustainable long-term strategies with build-in future add-on revenue streams.

Adding to this comes a social factor that prevents innovation to grow like putting salt on soil. The fear of failure is the industry’s biggest enemy. Spreading especially in Japan but lately in China and SAE as well, due to the fierce competition on the market, creatives tend to play safe by copy-paste. The fear of failing by doing something new and subsequently being socially isolated is just too overwhelming.

In general, Asia is a very fragmented market, different cultures, languages and systems. Pan-Asian projects have barely proven to be successful yet, while main driving markets like China and Japan becoming more and more self-isolated. South-Korea is still ruling the Asian entertainment segment with its strong content exports while China fails to gain its desperately desired international soft power share. Dynamics in the market are great and a structural rearrangement imminent.

Why is SAE such an interesting market when it comes to digital media?

For one, far different to any industrial country in the West, the average age in the SEA region is 30, most non-metropolitan areas even far below. A demographic that embraces new technology and is culturally more inclined to experiment – unlike the same demographic in China, where a consumption-only mentality reigns.

Within the years to come, all SEA countries that have not done so yet will install full coverage 3G mobile networks. This might sound like a long overdue technical adjustment of development countries. But one should not forget that this region never had coherently working (landlines) broadband internet yet, due to vast geographical challenges. Hence, we will soon see a number of demographics and generations that never had internet in the first place being exposed to mobile connectivity everywhere and anytime. The way these people will use and behave in the digital space will be radically different.

Creators’ independence in Singapore

Singapore happens to be one of the few Asian countries that hold specific public funds for new media projects, although those funds are new and barely taken advantage of. Fund criteria are often excluding the majority of projects up front or address an entirely different medium altogether. Four years back I was involved in the Singapore Integrated Media Fund, which is still up and running. Despite its fancy title the fund exclusively addressed the local production and spent of feature films.

The Media Development Authority of Singapore (MDA) has and is about to set up funds for digital hybrid media projects, in fact it recently opened a call for projects in partnership with Unilever. But word on the street amongst local producers is: “We’ll do it on our own”. There seems to be some sort of public funding fatigue going around as every creator in town has had his/her personal share of adventures with these funding structures.

The general opinion is, and I strongly agree with this, a local industry can only thrive when it finds its own independent ways to survive on a sustainable level. Subsidization models create an atmosphere of self-censorship and misleading self-content that could work against the growth of the industry. Hence, one could say Singaporean creators are about to discover their digital creative identity by finding new business models for the entertainment market outside the obsolete system.

Every time I go to Singapore my horizon of what transmedia can deliver widens tremendously. Personally, I am stepping more and more away from feature film and TV to get involved in the advertising side of things. Transmedia strategies for brand building, business development and corporate training. Transmedia as means for experiential marketing.

The line between entertainment and advertising is gradually but quite distinctively disappearing. Branded entertainment, specifically for mobile consumption, will soon be a major industry pillar. Obviously, transmedia is simply a form of mindset. How creators approach projects, open up content to audiences and deal with new revenue models.

Empathy Led Activation

During the countless meetings and talks of the past two months I met the Singaporean media producer turned transmedia visionary Isaac Ray Thomas. He created a concept that perfectly sums up where Singapore is headed with the commercial side of transmedia projects. He calls it “Empathy Led Activation” (ELA) and you can check out his SlideShare here:

ELA embodies terminologies company execs and marketing directors can relate to and provides a very precise angle on the qualities of transmedia strategies in Asia. It is the mere design thinking methodology in telling stories that explains how this power can be leveraged to create specific audience/consumer actions.

ELA does not stop at a simple action or reaction a consumer will do after or while being immersed in a story experience. It also can influence audience behavior in daily life. This aspect is especially interesting to brands when it comes to social issues as well as corporate social responsibility programs. Just recently Unilever addressed this aspect of story marketing.

Language & identity

Traditionally, Singapore as a market in itself is far too small and film & TV producers have turned to Malaysia or China a long time ago. Despite the huge success of Singaporean film in 2013, domestic box office as well as international festival circuit, more and more filmmakers read the digital signs of the market and want to transition into alternative formats of production.

While Singapore is still a new nation and storytellers trying to find their very own narrative voice, the city-state is also one of the most international cities in the world. I have been around quite a lot but that many nationalities and religions on one single island is quite unique. Hence, there is a significant potential for international content that can travel to come from this country. Expanding productions into the SEA region is just the start. Many creators want to go beyond and could prove that a successful cross-cultural transmedia project can exist.

However, this cultural diversity also comes with an ongoing struggle about language identity within the traditional entertainment sector. “While we love movies from Hollywood or the United Kingdom, we do not want to see locals speak the same language they do.” Evidently, it boils down to the instant comparison between production values of Western English and local English movies/TV, where Singapore always picks the short end.

Traditional media around the world is facing the same issue, whereas transmedia can offer alternative points of entry for audiences; outside the boundaries of its own preoccupations and expectations. Therefore having barely international established formula or standards for transmedia production values is an advantage and eliminates quality comparisons up front.

On top, dealing with a variety of languages is something most local new media creators already do on a daily basis. Social media interactions and maintenance is done in at least two languages (English and Chinese), often even specialized channels for Tamil and Malay are being included to a project.

Hence, transmedia creators will be better equipped in dealing with various languages at ones and know how to work them into the stories in the first place, while those coming from traditional media need to adopt. New media technology also enables more diverse language implementations and is often more flexible to expand with the audience, like adding subtitles or providing more language options inside apps. This integrative aspect makes it an easy way to address and reach out to an audience outside the borders of Singapore.

Technology drivers

NFC/RFID appears to be a technology tool with untapped potential for creators in the region. Despite the wide use in the public transportation and card payments sectors it has yet to be commonly adopted by event organizers and especially storytellers for location based interactions.

OTT (Smart TV) will be one of the major drivers across Asia, tied in with m-Commerce. Spearheaded by the Chinese market, where a number of video platforms and media groups started co-operations with TV manufacturers, we will soon see an epic merger of mobile, commerce and entertainment. Tencent for instance, which runs highly popular web and mobile chat services like QQ and WeChat develops an in-house mobile payment system that integrates to their new Smart TV system WeChat TV, rolling out before Chinese New Year.

Meanwhile in Singapore, TV networks are still hesitant when it comes to leveraging OTT’s full potential with tailor made content and integrated cross-services. During a panel discussion at Screen Singapore in early December 2013, Lee Soo Hui, Head of Media Business Unit at Starhub, mentioned that the network is interested in going into the transmedia direction but still has not found the right local content. The other TV network giant, Mediacorp, does offer a variety of integrated (very) early stage OTT and online viewing infrastructures with its services Toggle and Xinmsn but seems to struggle taking the next step forward. The sociocultural conundrum outlined above is still in play here.

As one of my personal pet projects, I still see entertainment potential in the live action content Fulldome format, which has proven to be the most immersive tool of visual storytelling on the market. High-resolution Fulldome features tied in with an extended (mobile) transmedia experience outside the projection venue will take up a major stake of the business.

However, the venue infrastructure in SEA has yet to be established. China on the other hand will surely lead the introduction of this format as it has been subsidizing new dome venues for the past years and is ready when it comes to digital distribution infrastructures.

Transmedia in Singapore will start small and incremental. Dealing with the budget issue lean ways of rolling out a project will become the best practice. Given what kind of projects are being developed and pitched right now, location based transmedia experiences appear to dominate the first wave of projects.

I am reminded of this trend every day when passing the construction site of the new National Stadium. Singapore’s new sports hub and jewel of interactive media architecture. Once the stadium opens it will surely be a sandbox for advertisers and experience designers.

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The journey ahead

Now, this article might sound like that there have been no substantial projects produced in Singapore so far. In fact, talented Singaporean creators already came up with remarkable transmedia experiences over the past 6 years. Some even commissioned by large brands, others gained short-lived international media recognition. However, still, the market kept dismissing the trend and the signs of time, till now.

There is no doubt that Singapore is about to become a pioneering hub for transmedia in Asia. However, this development is not ignited by government initiatives, festival labs or academic programs. It is a movement solely headed by a small but growing group of independent creators that circumvent the corporate gate-keeping mentality by offering integrated strategies execs cannot refuse.

Communicating and educating what transmedia concepts are about in a language brands understand while creating tailor made content for and with the local audience will be their selling point. Once this is clearly communicated it will be obvious for brands and agencies that without pivoting to a transmedia approach in customer relationship management there will be too much left on the table.

Singapore is no media paradise at this point in time, but rather a rough territory for digital prospectors. The chances for striking gold are plenty but also risky. While the journey ahead is still long and bumpy, the direction is clear.

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Notes:

As there are a couple more factors that come into play but have been barely touched upon, I will publish an extended and updated version of this article, especially addressing the implications and changes of the movie industry in SEA with the emergence of transmedia in the region, in the upcoming edition of our Asian Screen report series.

For all Singapore creators and producers, I created a monthly meetup series where we discuss about transmedia concepts, latest local projects and exchange ideas. Please join the community of storytellers here. For everyone outside of Singapore feel free to join as well and stay in touch with the local industry on news, projects and future reports.

#transmedia watch Hong Kong (summer 2013 edition) Hong Kong’s movie marketing 2.0 and the attempt to be “transmedia”

After Hollywood’s two reigning emperors proclaimed a soon implosion of the movie industry distributors are under pressure to make this summer’s tent-pole blockbusters work. In fact the pressure is so great that even lethargic HK distributors uppen their game. The “innovations” that are hitting the streets right now would not be worth mentioning in any other city, but here in HK they are a big step forward after years of ignoring what happened in other markets.

Hurray, we got NFC!

One of the major players and often innovation implementers is JCDecaux. Simply because it runs all signages and ad spaces on the MTR, an environment with traditionally steady amount of foot-traffic as well as tech savvy consumer demographic. We have seen a great deal of escalator redesigns via custom made large scale sticker posters and turning entire corridors into Canon’s scenic photo landscapes or giant crawling babies trying to sell diapers and milk formula.

Let’s first talk about an old troublemaker, the QR code. It is still a constant in the MTR ad sphere despite the countless failing attempts of advertisers to make it work. Posters with QR codes are regarded as interactive advertising and hence can considered as paramount practice (from a HK perspective). JCD tries different ways to make them work as this means business to them. Entire poster campaigns were created that help educate the usage of QR codes.

Earlier this year JCD launched Pricerite’s virtual e-store on the MTR by installing posters displaying the company’s product range, each with a QR code that would let you order products on the spot (http://www.campaignasia.com/Article/340614,jcdecaux-helps-pricerite-launch-8216virtual-e-store8217-campaign-in-mtr.aspx). Tesco ran this campaign already 2 years ago and it was picked up in Japan and Europe before this began making sense to a HK based brand.

As Samsung gained tremendous market share on the HK smart phone sector in the past year the introduction of NFC enabled advertising has become a viable option. As integrative measure, JCD came up with a QR/NFC bundle package that not only provides the physical linkage on site but also the online content. Film distributors (and other advertisers) do not have to worry about their landing page content anymore and whether it works.

After introducing this strategy in March quick responding brands like Osim or SKII used this offer, even before Samsung itself jumped on it. Now, we see the first movie campaign rolling out with this technology, Pacific Rim. I talked about Warner’s mobile content debacle with the Dark Knight Rises last summer in my 2012 recap post. This time they simply outsourced to JCD to make it work and it really works. But then again, what do people who actually scan either of the codes get? A small mobile enabled landing page with 1 link to like the movie’s HK Facebook page and 2 links to YouTube trailers.

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Last year we were already experimenting in-house with NFC enabled posters to our projects, using the same NFC stickers like JCD is doing now. A poster would have several NFC spots and users that scan would receive different video clips according to the character pictured. However, as a standalone gimmick this did not make much sense, so we tried to include it into a wider outdoor experience concept. However, we decided to use NFC stickers for BluRay covers to our projects in order to provide an additional story extension tool.

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At the end of the day, NFC is a 1 way communication channel. So what exactly is the interactive value from JCD’s code bundle product and why should passengers on the MTR bother scanning the codes? To be honest, I have yet to see someone stopping in front of any poster and scanning a code. In fact, when I did pictures of this poster and tried the code passersby looked at me as I were crazy and would do something socially offending. Do we have a certain behavioral barrier on interacting with content in HK? Unfortunately, when it comes to regular content like this, yes. But not so much when it comes to yellow rubber ducks or cute, fluffy monsters.

Hurray, we got ice cream and games!

I also mentioned in the 2012 recap that Disney is being heading the transmedia game in HK. They continue doing so with Monster University by creating the movie’s campus in front of the Time Square shopping mall. Tie-ins with fashion brands and countless other merchandising deals flooding the city for weeks now. When something is rolling out that huge in HK it must be successful at the box office, at least that is the traditional thinking pattern. The illusion of “it’s big” always prevails over “it’s good” and people will flock to the cinemas. But will Disney break even on these marketing expenses just by the theatrical run revenue in HK? Probably not, and they do not have to anyways.

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Other distributors trying to gain some ground at the animation front. Fox started to deploy an all branded ice cream truck for its latest features The Croods and Turbo. But what is more important to Fox than animation is Wolverine this year. The studio’s very own super-hero franchise summer blockbuster that goes up against Warner’s Man of Steel and Marvel’s (Disney) Iron Man 3. Hence, the movie’s importance is so tremendous that Fox set up an interactive game screen that uses motion recognition and a touch screen to be controlled by the visitors of a 2nd tier shopping mall in Tsim Sha Tsui East.

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What we might get and others already have…

In South-Korea, CJ Entertainment experimented with the Wi-Fi Poster to get people engaged. Passersby can access a dedicated wifi network that is being send out by the poster in order to access the movie’s webpage. Ultimately this bears little potential. While the technology is intriguing it just replaces the process of scanning something with logging into an open network without having actual content value add on or interactivity with the movie’s story universe.

Last year, we also experimented in-house with image recognition apps that would overlay video content on specific photos or locations as sort of augmented reality interface for your smart phone’s camera (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUeSLLpKsrQ). The app is called Aurasma and is connected with Google Maps. Users can create their own points of photo recognition and input own content. Recently, Getty Images picked up this technology for their “Transmedia Storytelling” campaign. The campaigns preferred carrier app is Ogle which is based upon Aurasma. In June, we had the chance to present Getty’s augmented reality enabled photo packets at the HK Webfest 2013 for the first time ever.

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While the above mentioned technology is available for your smart phone, you always need to do a step or 2 before actually “interacting” with the content given. Either downloading and installing an app or connecting to another network. I always tell participants in my transmedia seminars that they need to start thinking about how to create content for interactions with something users/audience are already using instead of establishing something new which creates additional work and education.

Something that comes this concept the closest are the Weibo walls found in Beijing cinema lobbies. You can log into the wall directly from your Weibo account on the phone and grand the wall access to your phone’s photo folder in order to add your pictures and messages to the wall by a swipe. The technology is simple. There is no direct communication between the wall and the phone, it all runs through Weibo. Hence, the possibilities for service providers/advertisers/content producers to gather a vast amount of behavioral data is enormous.

In HK we also have a number of tech startups already holding solutions that help tracking and collecting such data. When we visited this year’s exhibition of the ICT Awards 2013 Winners there were 2 companies that offered digital signages that not only provide a large touch screen solution, for example for cinema ticket bookings, but also recognize and analyze facial expressions while customers using the device. Now, content can be specifically tailored for usage. This technology also works in app form on tablets or smart phones. Admittedly, while this technology is the wet dream of every advertiser it also sounds scary as we already arrived at Spielberg’s Minority Report, with which the loop of the industry’s imminent implosion would come to a close.

HK Webfest sets launch pad for new branded entertainment strategies via transmedia storytelling in Asia

First edition of the HK Webfest to launch during Le French May on June 5 with international conference and screenings.

HONG KONG (20/05/2013) Hong Kong’s first festival for web content, transmedia, branded entertainment and webseries will start on 5th of June as associated project of the annual Le French May.

Being a part of a global webfestival network – with such locations as Los Angeles, Marseille and Melbourne – the first edition of the Hong Kong Webfest will bring to town such international speakers as Frederic Josue (Head of Marketing at Havas Media), Mourgan Bouchet (Vice President at Orange) and Nicolas Thorin (Director of Internet advertising M6), among others, to present and discuss the future of the entertainment industry in regards to what technology and new business models can do to the way content creators develop the stories that best engage a connected global audience. Local Hong Kong speakers are also represented during the conference day including Oonagh Chan (Head of Broadcasting Services HK Jockey Club)​, Maryann Hwee (Executive Director of FringeBacker), Charlie Toller (Director and founder BrandBeatAsia)​​ and many more​.

Another important topic at the event will be how new cross-platform dependent projects and their finance structures are disrupting the Television/Film Theater market, creating immensely popular franchises and creating multiple connection points (and long-tail revenue) with their avid viewers.

Taking place at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (from the 5th of June to the 7th), the event provides a valuable forum for emerging talents from around the city, mainly focusing on new talents and innovative thinkers in the industry.

With such projects showcased like Guidestones (A HK financed Canadian production that has recently received the Emmy award for Best Digital Program), GwanGong VS Alien (an ICT and Freshwave award winner from Hong Kong) and a Heiward Mak microfilms special, attendees will have the opportunity to interact, discuss and critique the content present at the Webfest with the intent to further push the Hong Kong local creative industry into maintaining its stance as a media player in the global new media market.

Furthermore, for the first time in the city, this type of event will have its registration and ticketing system running through a NFC enabled platform, connected to the audience’s social media channels and helping the attendees in interacting with their channels and friends through local check-ins, event photos and branded lucky draws.

Festival director Marco Sparmberg explains, “The HK Webfest is at the intersection of cutting edge media technology, cross platform distribution, digital marketing and transmedia storytelling. All these sectors will merge eventually and we have to find new business models for the industry along this way.”

With support from Le French May, the Consulate general of France in Hong Kong and Macao, Alliance Française, Getty Images, Yesasia.com, Alive.cn, RealLifeConnect and several Hong Kong Startups, the event aims to become a staple in the content and  entertainment calendar, striving for a local connected, interactive and expansive creative community with a global reach.

Register for a free NFC enabled festival pass here:  http://reallifeconnect.com/event130/reg

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首屆香港網絡節會在「法國五月」期間舉行(6月5日至7日),會與法國五月其他活動一齊放送。

香港網絡節2013將聚焦本土及國際的跨媒體平台發展,關注新興媒體的視覺語言及傳播方式,同時探討隨之而生的新型國際資金合作模式。大會邀請業界的專業人士作為評委,鼓勵香港本土的創作人充分展示創意,提供創作及製作適合於跨媒體發行作品的機會,以延續香港“創意之都”的神話。

尋求新媒體體裁及跨平台傳播方式,已經成為世界各傳媒領域的製作人,投資人及管理高層等高端人士的共同大目標。作為亞洲的國際級城市,香港勢必緊貼時

代尖端,大力發展新興的媒體體裁及平台,包括網絡短片,跨媒體作品,娛樂式軟性宣傳片及植入廣告,以及網絡連續劇等。

香港網絡節作為一個全球性活動,其他地點有洛杉磯、馬賽和及墨爾本。本屆香港網絡節有國際講者如Frederic Josue(Havas Media市場營銷總監)、Mourgan BOUCHET(Orange副總裁)、尼古拉•索林(M6網絡廣告總監)等。本地講者有陳王靜敏女士(香港賽馬會主管廣播事務部主管),Maryann Hwee(FringeBacker執行董事),Charlie Toller(BrandBeatAsia董事和創始人)等。

會議中會提出並討論未來的娛樂行業方面可以做什麼樣的技術和新的商業模式的方式等。內容製作者開發的故事及如何連接全球觀眾。另外一個重要議題將是新媒體的跨平台相關項目如何影響現有電視/電影影院市場結構。

如出席,請到http://reallifeconnect.com/event130/reg登記

 

HK Webfest online:

Downloads:

Additional press links:

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About Haexagon Concepts

Haexagon Concepts is Hong Kong’s first transmedia storytelling and project development workshop dedicated to create and implement new forms of digital, immersive and interactive story formats into the Asian entertainment market. We help brands, filmmakers and media producers to find new business models for their stories within the world of merging and emerging media. Building targeted audiences is as essential as equipping content creators with the right technology and distribution strategy in order to connect them to their audience base.

For more information about Haexagon Concepts, visit http://haexagon.org

關於Haexagon概念

Haexagon概念是香港首個跨媒體講故事和項目發展研討會,致力於建立和實施新形式的數字化,身臨其境,進入亞洲娛樂市場的互動故事格式。我們幫助尋找新的商業模式,他們的故事在世界的合併和新興媒體的品牌,電影工作者和媒體生產者。建設目標受眾是必要的,因為裝備用正確的技術和分銷策略的內容創作​​者,為了將它們連接到他們的觀眾群。

如需更多信息有關Haexagon概念,請訪問http://haexagon.org

About Le French May

Organized by the Consulate General of France in collaboration with the Alliance Française, and with the support of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of Hong Kong, Le French May is one of the major art festivals in Hong Kong and Macau.

Dedicated to the promotion of the French arts and creativity, in order to facilitate the cultural exchanges between Hong Kong and France, Le French May is open to the general public for everyone’s enjoyment. The Festival has attracted over 3 millions of participants and spectators since its inception in 1993.

With more than 500 events, Le French May presents the widest choice of artistic disciplines, from visual arts to opera, classical and contemporary dance, music and theatre, as well as circus and cinema.

By developing Le French GourMay and Le French Fashion May, the Festival also invests the fields of fashion and culinary arts, and promotes new talented designers and chefs.

For more information about Le French May, visit http://www.frenchmay.com

關於法國五月

法國五月是由法國駐香港總領事館與法語聯盟合作,並與香港康樂及文化事務署的支持下,舉辦的主要在香港及澳門藝術節之一。

法國五月,致力於推動法國藝術和創造力,以促進香港與法國之間的文化交流,是大家享受向公眾開放的。自1993年成立以來,藝術節已吸引了超過3百萬的參與者和觀眾。

隨著超過500個事件,法國五月提出的藝術學科最廣泛的選擇,從視覺藝術,歌劇,古典和現代舞蹈,音樂和戲劇,以及馬戲團和電影院。

通過開發法國五月美食節和法國時裝五月,藝術節還投資領域的時尚和烹飪藝術,並促進新的有才華的設計師和廚師。

關於法國五月欲了解更多信息,請訪問http://www.frenchmay.com

Contacts:

For HK Webfest

Queenie Wong (festival manager)

r1020, New Commerce Centre,

19 On Sum Street, Shatin, Hong Kong

hkwf@haexagon.org

Tel: (852) 90324468 / Fax: (852) 35680637

 

For Le French May

Anne-Sophie LEHEC

Audiovisual attaché

Consulate General of France in Hong Kong and Macau

25/F, Tower II, Admiralty Centre, 18 Harcourt Road, Central, Hong Kong

Tel: (852) 3752 9982 / Fax: (852) 3752 9908

enquiry@frenchmay.com