#transmedia watch Hong Kong (Summer 2013 edition v.2)

This HK Transmedia Watch follow-up post will showcase a small local student project that combines Indonesian Puppetry with transmedia elements as well as take a look at the endorsement culture and stalling strategies of local film distributors when it comes to promotion gambles that potentially maximizing the box office results.

Digital Wayang

I stumbled more less by “accident” upon this project as Facebook was targeting a sponsored post to my wall on the day of the event. Created by a group of media design students from HK Polytechnic University, this project attempts to revive the almost lost artistry of the Indonesian Puppet/Shadow Play and its vast and rich storytelling heritage by the use of digital means.

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Core of Digital Wayang was a live performance of renowned puppet artist Aldy Sanjaya who came to HK with his whole set of traditional puppets to present a part of the well known Ramayana story. He was accompanied by a set of story world supporting animations projected onto the stage.

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The project also includes a board game of which I was fortunate enough to receive one of the prototypes. A digital version of this game will soon be released as iPad app and brings the user deeper into the fascinating universe of Wayang. After the digital show Sanjaya gave an introduction to Indonesian culture and the history of his puppetry art.

IMG_7564 Digital Wayang offered a mesmerizing experience of visuals, game and culture. It gave a glimpse into how traditional art can be garner to a young audience by the use of transmedia. While the limitations of the project within this academic environment were outweighing its commercial appeal, it still displayed the potential of interdisciplinary media and experiential entertainment based on traditional storytelling and local culture. It most definitely made me research on Indonesian puppet theater and think about other ways of “media-upgrading” this unique story experience.

http://www.digitalwayang.com/

https://www.facebook.com/digitalwayang

http://digitalwayang.blogspot.hk/

Endorsement culture

The heavily buzzed local dance film The Way We Dance launched at HK theaters early August after being locked up for 5 months following its premiere screening in March 2013. The distributor applied the frequently used and favored strategy of withholding a local film, produced for a local audience, from the local market while running it on festivals all over the world. I’ll talk a bit more about this specific market stalling tactics later on, let me walk you through the marketing choreography of this film first.

Obviously, The Way We Dance comes off as HK’s version of Street Dance and taps into the most desirable target demographic imaginable. Street dancing is tremendously popular amongst local teens and even tweens, and presents its local story about following your dreams with up and coming music and model stars. Hence, the vitally important Millennial audience group is perfectly served. In fact, this concept is the wet dream of a HK producer and sounds like a money making machine. The Street Dance films have produced solid box office results so far. What could possibly go wrong with a localized version?

The traditional marketing machinery was quickly ramping up after screenings at Udine and Edinburgh. Appearances of cast and crew at preview screenings, radio shows, TV and a street performance of graffiti artists tied in with people holding up pre-selected cards with dream wishes for a nice Facebook photo. Social media was leveraged to its fullest. Events at HK universities and WeChat where actors talk, talk, talk, talk and talk… (not dance).

The 360-buzz worked. Word of mouth and reviews have been dazzling positive throughout. The distributor lined up a typhoon of veteran film stars and director legends like Ann Hui to endorse the project publicly (without understanding the culture behind it though). One could have the impression this project is a collective effort of the entire HK film industry, at least what is left of it anyway. The veterans praised the film with comparisons to the HK New Wave movement from the early 1980s. Wait! WHAT??? A film that is about street dancing and targeted to Millennials? Kids that consider everything older than 5 years is dusted movie history?

Clearly there is a significant disconnect between this traditional art film campaign and and the YouTube generation it is created for. It does not matter how often the audience sees the film’s cute actors talking about themselves and how amazing the production time was. A campaign simply renders ineffective once no one thought about how to get these kids involve and let them interact. After all it IS about dancing and music. Fast, vibrant, connected and energetic. This is what a campaign needs to serve to keep pace with its audience. What they got instead was a snail race and the films own audience outrun it the moment the crew started shooting in silence.

In fact, cinemas saw what was going on with the film’s marketing and gave it a limited amount of shows for it’s opening weekend. The first 4 days (including previews) cashed in a solid but not overwhelming HK$ 1.4 million. Considering the amount of buzz this borders at the realms of under-performance. But HK kids love the film, they want it to be a success. Hence, they jump in where the distributor failed. Large amounts of tickets are being bought up by fans, sold amongst their friends via WhatsApp, WeChat and Facebook. Others create Facebook events to get their peers mobilized. The effort was enormous and picked up speed quickly. Usually, a local film would drop in admissions during it’s first week in cinemas but The Way We Dance managed to keep steadily afloat, with a total box office of HK$ 3.54 after the 2nd weekend.

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Just as side comparison, Dante Lam’s new film Unbeatable (admittedly a more commercial and mainstream production) just made HK$ 9.46 after 4 days (including previews). Even though it got more screens in cinemas it had a slightly less buzzed traditional campaign going, mainly based on 1 single magazine cover. While Unbeatable aims for a clearly higher demographic that is fewer in numbers, I dare to say that the core message of following your dream is equally included like in The Way We Dance.

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Recently, another local release went for a similar basic marketing campaign. The horror film omnibus series Tales From The Dark. My very first encounter with Tales was at the cinema. Right in-between thundering trailers to Men of Steel and The Wolverine there was this two and a half minute something with a supposedly scary background music and a dozen of HK stars trying to convince me how horrifying and cool this flick would be. Essentially I sat through interviews disguised as trailer.

This is a very common way of promoting films. Usually the first teaser to a local production is always a 2 minute making of. Personally I find that most irritating. After all, Hollywood studios won’t show you how the Avengers look like in front of a green screen before the first teaser trailer with all the smashing effects is out there for months already.

Endorsements have become the prime objective to all marketing efforts. The actual film has become less important than the person that is endorsing it. What distributors forget is that this situation resonates very little with the Millennials demographic but rather engages a far older audience that is less willing to spend their quality time in dark rooms with small screens. Eventually the economics are simple. When distributors target the senior demographic group the box office result will be less due to the discount schemes. On top, this audience group will most likely choose weekend morning shows which brings the discount ticket price even further down.

Stalling as promotion

Let me cycle back to the notorious stalling tactics by distributors. It has become fashionable to premiere and run a HK film abroad for a period up to 1 year till it finally hits the locals screens in its own market. Usually this involves screenings at festivals while domestic press is reporting about the raving reviews and marketing stunts this film does somewhere on the other side of the globe. Ann Hui’s A Simple Life was such a case. The cultural conscious proofs this tactics right. HK audience seems to react very strongly to things that they are excluded from. Hence witnessing a local film doing its theater run in North America builds up an enormous urge to see this “forbidden” treasure once the local distributor is gracious enough to allow it to its own viewers.

Since this has proven to ensure the success of a film in HK we usually get to see all the highlights of HK  cinema for the running year during the industry’s fair Filmart in March as stealth screenings or one-off events until their actual release far later down the road. Pang Ho Cheung’s Vulgaria was such a shelved title. But different to most films it gained significance in cultural meaning and momentum during the months of hiding from the screens due to political developments and trends in HK happening in spring and summer 2012.

Apparently, some local films are being shelved for several years as the distributors wait for a miracle. Obviously the main trouble does not lie within distribution but rather the fact that local films are being produced without the slightest attempt to gather the needed market and audience research up front. In fact most local films are never intended to be appreciated by a local audience and hence will never see the point of significance for a release.

What strikes me recently is the silent underground movement of the Bollywood films on HK’s screens that discloses what’s wrong with the city’s marketing thinking of maintaining the status quo instead of pivoting to innovation. Evidently there is a growing community of HK moviegoers that appreciates the extravaganza only an Indian film can offer these days. It is a rare exception that Bollywood films get picked up by local distributors or even see a wider release despite the proven recent success of films like 3 Idiots or Barfi. However, there are still day-and-date released of all the big blockbusters.

Specialized niche distributors like Cineworld, sitting somewhere inside Chungking Mansion, with strong connections to the home land buy up entire screens and resell the tickets. Shows are usually limited but always sold out. In fact ticket sales go so well that after one of the major cinemas in town that had the seat capacity and “willingness” to book Bollywood films closed down earlier this year, shows moved to an IMAX screen.

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#transmedia watch Hong Kong (summer 2013 edition) Hong Kong’s movie marketing 2.0 and the attempt to be “transmedia”

After Hollywood’s two reigning emperors proclaimed a soon implosion of the movie industry distributors are under pressure to make this summer’s tent-pole blockbusters work. In fact the pressure is so great that even lethargic HK distributors uppen their game. The “innovations” that are hitting the streets right now would not be worth mentioning in any other city, but here in HK they are a big step forward after years of ignoring what happened in other markets.

Hurray, we got NFC!

One of the major players and often innovation implementers is JCDecaux. Simply because it runs all signages and ad spaces on the MTR, an environment with traditionally steady amount of foot-traffic as well as tech savvy consumer demographic. We have seen a great deal of escalator redesigns via custom made large scale sticker posters and turning entire corridors into Canon’s scenic photo landscapes or giant crawling babies trying to sell diapers and milk formula.

Let’s first talk about an old troublemaker, the QR code. It is still a constant in the MTR ad sphere despite the countless failing attempts of advertisers to make it work. Posters with QR codes are regarded as interactive advertising and hence can considered as paramount practice (from a HK perspective). JCD tries different ways to make them work as this means business to them. Entire poster campaigns were created that help educate the usage of QR codes.

Earlier this year JCD launched Pricerite’s virtual e-store on the MTR by installing posters displaying the company’s product range, each with a QR code that would let you order products on the spot (http://www.campaignasia.com/Article/340614,jcdecaux-helps-pricerite-launch-8216virtual-e-store8217-campaign-in-mtr.aspx). Tesco ran this campaign already 2 years ago and it was picked up in Japan and Europe before this began making sense to a HK based brand.

As Samsung gained tremendous market share on the HK smart phone sector in the past year the introduction of NFC enabled advertising has become a viable option. As integrative measure, JCD came up with a QR/NFC bundle package that not only provides the physical linkage on site but also the online content. Film distributors (and other advertisers) do not have to worry about their landing page content anymore and whether it works.

After introducing this strategy in March quick responding brands like Osim or SKII used this offer, even before Samsung itself jumped on it. Now, we see the first movie campaign rolling out with this technology, Pacific Rim. I talked about Warner’s mobile content debacle with the Dark Knight Rises last summer in my 2012 recap post. This time they simply outsourced to JCD to make it work and it really works. But then again, what do people who actually scan either of the codes get? A small mobile enabled landing page with 1 link to like the movie’s HK Facebook page and 2 links to YouTube trailers.

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Last year we were already experimenting in-house with NFC enabled posters to our projects, using the same NFC stickers like JCD is doing now. A poster would have several NFC spots and users that scan would receive different video clips according to the character pictured. However, as a standalone gimmick this did not make much sense, so we tried to include it into a wider outdoor experience concept. However, we decided to use NFC stickers for BluRay covers to our projects in order to provide an additional story extension tool.

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At the end of the day, NFC is a 1 way communication channel. So what exactly is the interactive value from JCD’s code bundle product and why should passengers on the MTR bother scanning the codes? To be honest, I have yet to see someone stopping in front of any poster and scanning a code. In fact, when I did pictures of this poster and tried the code passersby looked at me as I were crazy and would do something socially offending. Do we have a certain behavioral barrier on interacting with content in HK? Unfortunately, when it comes to regular content like this, yes. But not so much when it comes to yellow rubber ducks or cute, fluffy monsters.

Hurray, we got ice cream and games!

I also mentioned in the 2012 recap that Disney is being heading the transmedia game in HK. They continue doing so with Monster University by creating the movie’s campus in front of the Time Square shopping mall. Tie-ins with fashion brands and countless other merchandising deals flooding the city for weeks now. When something is rolling out that huge in HK it must be successful at the box office, at least that is the traditional thinking pattern. The illusion of “it’s big” always prevails over “it’s good” and people will flock to the cinemas. But will Disney break even on these marketing expenses just by the theatrical run revenue in HK? Probably not, and they do not have to anyways.

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Other distributors trying to gain some ground at the animation front. Fox started to deploy an all branded ice cream truck for its latest features The Croods and Turbo. But what is more important to Fox than animation is Wolverine this year. The studio’s very own super-hero franchise summer blockbuster that goes up against Warner’s Man of Steel and Marvel’s (Disney) Iron Man 3. Hence, the movie’s importance is so tremendous that Fox set up an interactive game screen that uses motion recognition and a touch screen to be controlled by the visitors of a 2nd tier shopping mall in Tsim Sha Tsui East.

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What we might get and others already have…

In South-Korea, CJ Entertainment experimented with the Wi-Fi Poster to get people engaged. Passersby can access a dedicated wifi network that is being send out by the poster in order to access the movie’s webpage. Ultimately this bears little potential. While the technology is intriguing it just replaces the process of scanning something with logging into an open network without having actual content value add on or interactivity with the movie’s story universe.

Last year, we also experimented in-house with image recognition apps that would overlay video content on specific photos or locations as sort of augmented reality interface for your smart phone’s camera (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUeSLLpKsrQ). The app is called Aurasma and is connected with Google Maps. Users can create their own points of photo recognition and input own content. Recently, Getty Images picked up this technology for their “Transmedia Storytelling” campaign. The campaigns preferred carrier app is Ogle which is based upon Aurasma. In June, we had the chance to present Getty’s augmented reality enabled photo packets at the HK Webfest 2013 for the first time ever.

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While the above mentioned technology is available for your smart phone, you always need to do a step or 2 before actually “interacting” with the content given. Either downloading and installing an app or connecting to another network. I always tell participants in my transmedia seminars that they need to start thinking about how to create content for interactions with something users/audience are already using instead of establishing something new which creates additional work and education.

Something that comes this concept the closest are the Weibo walls found in Beijing cinema lobbies. You can log into the wall directly from your Weibo account on the phone and grand the wall access to your phone’s photo folder in order to add your pictures and messages to the wall by a swipe. The technology is simple. There is no direct communication between the wall and the phone, it all runs through Weibo. Hence, the possibilities for service providers/advertisers/content producers to gather a vast amount of behavioral data is enormous.

In HK we also have a number of tech startups already holding solutions that help tracking and collecting such data. When we visited this year’s exhibition of the ICT Awards 2013 Winners there were 2 companies that offered digital signages that not only provide a large touch screen solution, for example for cinema ticket bookings, but also recognize and analyze facial expressions while customers using the device. Now, content can be specifically tailored for usage. This technology also works in app form on tablets or smart phones. Admittedly, while this technology is the wet dream of every advertiser it also sounds scary as we already arrived at Spielberg’s Minority Report, with which the loop of the industry’s imminent implosion would come to a close.

HKWebfest 2013 Snaptee t-shirt design contest winners

HK based mobile app startup Snaptee is official sponsor of the HK Webfest 2013 and not only sponsored the festival’s staff outfit but also created a mobile contest where participants can create and design own t-shirts via Snaptee’s iOS app. Themes had to be related to the festival. By the end of the contest on June 9 a large number of designs were submitted to the dedicated contest page: http://snaptee.co/contest/hkwebfest

4 winners have been selected and will receive their t-shirt coupon codes via email (shown are platform user names):

– howardtian
– fleee04
– etchy
– hongkonggong

Big congrats to all winners and thanks for all your creative submission!

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About Snaptee Limited

Snaptee Limited is a startup based in Hong Kong founded by Wai-Lun Hong and Gary Lee, who previously bootstrapped a startup to USD 5 million revenue in 2 years without outside funding. Now, the two entrepreneurs are building Snaptee to realize everyone’s creativity.

About the 2013 Hong Kong Webfest

The first event of its kind in Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Webfest aims to  connect international and local brands with local content creators in order to discover new forms of how transmedia storytelling can be utilized for brand building and especially audience reach. The festival comprises of screenings, panel discussions and Google Hangout sessions featuring experts from France, Singapore and China. The festival is an Associated Project of the 2013 Le French May and is supported by the Los Angeles Webfest and the Marseilles Webfest.

YesAsia sponsors the first ever Hong Kong Webfest

Online retailer YesAsia.com proudly sponsors the first ever Hong Kong Webfest, which runs from June 5 to 7, 2013. An Associated Project of the Consulate General of France and Alliance Française’s Le French May program, the Hong Kong Webfest 2013 aims to encourage local creators to produce content with transmedia tools and production models, continuing Hong Kong’s success as a creative hub.

In addition to providing informative panel discussions and project presentations by international industry experts about the world of transmedia and branded entertainment, the 2013 Hong Kong Webfest will also screen the latest web series from Hong Kong.

As the number one Internet source of Asian entertainment products for over a decade, YesAsia is dedicated to fostering fresh talents and encouraging creativity in Asian entertainment by sponsoring the first edition of this groundbreaking event. YesAsia is supporting the festival with a cash donation and offering discount coupons for the event attendees.

“We are truly proud to have the support of YesAsia for the very first Hong Kong Webfest,” says Festival Director Marco Sparmberg. “With their support, YesAsia is helping to shape the future of Asia’s entertainment industry.”

 YA

[Winners of the YesAsia coupons]

About the 2013 Hong Kong Webfest

 The first event of its kind in Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Webfest aims to  connect international and local brands with local content creators in order to discover new forms of how transmedia storytelling can be utilized for brand building and especially audience reach. The festival comprises of screenings, panel discussions and Google Hangout sessions featuring experts from France, Singapore and China. The festival is an Associated Project of the 2013 Le French May and is supported by the Los Angeles Webfest and the Marseilles Webfest.

HK Webfest sets launch pad for new branded entertainment strategies via transmedia storytelling in Asia

First edition of the HK Webfest to launch during Le French May on June 5 with international conference and screenings.

HONG KONG (20/05/2013) Hong Kong’s first festival for web content, transmedia, branded entertainment and webseries will start on 5th of June as associated project of the annual Le French May.

Being a part of a global webfestival network – with such locations as Los Angeles, Marseille and Melbourne – the first edition of the Hong Kong Webfest will bring to town such international speakers as Frederic Josue (Head of Marketing at Havas Media), Mourgan Bouchet (Vice President at Orange) and Nicolas Thorin (Director of Internet advertising M6), among others, to present and discuss the future of the entertainment industry in regards to what technology and new business models can do to the way content creators develop the stories that best engage a connected global audience. Local Hong Kong speakers are also represented during the conference day including Oonagh Chan (Head of Broadcasting Services HK Jockey Club)​, Maryann Hwee (Executive Director of FringeBacker), Charlie Toller (Director and founder BrandBeatAsia)​​ and many more​.

Another important topic at the event will be how new cross-platform dependent projects and their finance structures are disrupting the Television/Film Theater market, creating immensely popular franchises and creating multiple connection points (and long-tail revenue) with their avid viewers.

Taking place at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (from the 5th of June to the 7th), the event provides a valuable forum for emerging talents from around the city, mainly focusing on new talents and innovative thinkers in the industry.

With such projects showcased like Guidestones (A HK financed Canadian production that has recently received the Emmy award for Best Digital Program), GwanGong VS Alien (an ICT and Freshwave award winner from Hong Kong) and a Heiward Mak microfilms special, attendees will have the opportunity to interact, discuss and critique the content present at the Webfest with the intent to further push the Hong Kong local creative industry into maintaining its stance as a media player in the global new media market.

Furthermore, for the first time in the city, this type of event will have its registration and ticketing system running through a NFC enabled platform, connected to the audience’s social media channels and helping the attendees in interacting with their channels and friends through local check-ins, event photos and branded lucky draws.

Festival director Marco Sparmberg explains, “The HK Webfest is at the intersection of cutting edge media technology, cross platform distribution, digital marketing and transmedia storytelling. All these sectors will merge eventually and we have to find new business models for the industry along this way.”

With support from Le French May, the Consulate general of France in Hong Kong and Macao, Alliance Française, Getty Images, Yesasia.com, Alive.cn, RealLifeConnect and several Hong Kong Startups, the event aims to become a staple in the content and  entertainment calendar, striving for a local connected, interactive and expansive creative community with a global reach.

Register for a free NFC enabled festival pass here:  http://reallifeconnect.com/event130/reg

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首屆香港網絡節會在「法國五月」期間舉行(6月5日至7日),會與法國五月其他活動一齊放送。

香港網絡節2013將聚焦本土及國際的跨媒體平台發展,關注新興媒體的視覺語言及傳播方式,同時探討隨之而生的新型國際資金合作模式。大會邀請業界的專業人士作為評委,鼓勵香港本土的創作人充分展示創意,提供創作及製作適合於跨媒體發行作品的機會,以延續香港“創意之都”的神話。

尋求新媒體體裁及跨平台傳播方式,已經成為世界各傳媒領域的製作人,投資人及管理高層等高端人士的共同大目標。作為亞洲的國際級城市,香港勢必緊貼時

代尖端,大力發展新興的媒體體裁及平台,包括網絡短片,跨媒體作品,娛樂式軟性宣傳片及植入廣告,以及網絡連續劇等。

香港網絡節作為一個全球性活動,其他地點有洛杉磯、馬賽和及墨爾本。本屆香港網絡節有國際講者如Frederic Josue(Havas Media市場營銷總監)、Mourgan BOUCHET(Orange副總裁)、尼古拉•索林(M6網絡廣告總監)等。本地講者有陳王靜敏女士(香港賽馬會主管廣播事務部主管),Maryann Hwee(FringeBacker執行董事),Charlie Toller(BrandBeatAsia董事和創始人)等。

會議中會提出並討論未來的娛樂行業方面可以做什麼樣的技術和新的商業模式的方式等。內容製作者開發的故事及如何連接全球觀眾。另外一個重要議題將是新媒體的跨平台相關項目如何影響現有電視/電影影院市場結構。

如出席,請到http://reallifeconnect.com/event130/reg登記

 

HK Webfest online:

Downloads:

Additional press links:

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About Haexagon Concepts

Haexagon Concepts is Hong Kong’s first transmedia storytelling and project development workshop dedicated to create and implement new forms of digital, immersive and interactive story formats into the Asian entertainment market. We help brands, filmmakers and media producers to find new business models for their stories within the world of merging and emerging media. Building targeted audiences is as essential as equipping content creators with the right technology and distribution strategy in order to connect them to their audience base.

For more information about Haexagon Concepts, visit http://haexagon.org

關於Haexagon概念

Haexagon概念是香港首個跨媒體講故事和項目發展研討會,致力於建立和實施新形式的數字化,身臨其境,進入亞洲娛樂市場的互動故事格式。我們幫助尋找新的商業模式,他們的故事在世界的合併和新興媒體的品牌,電影工作者和媒體生產者。建設目標受眾是必要的,因為裝備用正確的技術和分銷策略的內容創作​​者,為了將它們連接到他們的觀眾群。

如需更多信息有關Haexagon概念,請訪問http://haexagon.org

About Le French May

Organized by the Consulate General of France in collaboration with the Alliance Française, and with the support of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of Hong Kong, Le French May is one of the major art festivals in Hong Kong and Macau.

Dedicated to the promotion of the French arts and creativity, in order to facilitate the cultural exchanges between Hong Kong and France, Le French May is open to the general public for everyone’s enjoyment. The Festival has attracted over 3 millions of participants and spectators since its inception in 1993.

With more than 500 events, Le French May presents the widest choice of artistic disciplines, from visual arts to opera, classical and contemporary dance, music and theatre, as well as circus and cinema.

By developing Le French GourMay and Le French Fashion May, the Festival also invests the fields of fashion and culinary arts, and promotes new talented designers and chefs.

For more information about Le French May, visit http://www.frenchmay.com

關於法國五月

法國五月是由法國駐香港總領事館與法語聯盟合作,並與香港康樂及文化事務署的支持下,舉辦的主要在香港及澳門藝術節之一。

法國五月,致力於推動法國藝術和創造力,以促進香港與法國之間的文化交流,是大家享受向公眾開放的。自1993年成立以來,藝術節已吸引了超過3百萬的參與者和觀眾。

隨著超過500個事件,法國五月提出的藝術學科最廣泛的選擇,從視覺藝術,歌劇,古典和現代舞蹈,音樂和戲劇,以及馬戲團和電影院。

通過開發法國五月美食節和法國時裝五月,藝術節還投資領域的時尚和烹飪藝術,並促進新的有才華的設計師和廚師。

關於法國五月欲了解更多信息,請訪問http://www.frenchmay.com

Contacts:

For HK Webfest

Queenie Wong (festival manager)

r1020, New Commerce Centre,

19 On Sum Street, Shatin, Hong Kong

hkwf@haexagon.org

Tel: (852) 90324468 / Fax: (852) 35680637

 

For Le French May

Anne-Sophie LEHEC

Audiovisual attaché

Consulate General of France in Hong Kong and Macau

25/F, Tower II, Admiralty Centre, 18 Harcourt Road, Central, Hong Kong

Tel: (852) 3752 9982 / Fax: (852) 3752 9908

enquiry@frenchmay.com